About Us

About the Family Life CenterLess
About the Family Life Center

In 1992 the Family Life Center, Inc. was established as a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded to serve the economically distressed community of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. FLC was established in response to massive unemployment and economic decline within the community as a result of the decline in the manufacturing industry. At that time, the organization established programs focused on resiliency and self-improvement.

In 1992 the Family Life Center, Inc. was established as a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded to serve the economically distressed community of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. FLC was established in response to massive unemployment and economic decline within the community as a result of the decline in the manufacturing industry. At that time, the organization established programs focused on resiliency and self-improvement.

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The Family Life Center MissionLess
The Family Life Center Mission

Family Life Center’s mission is to empower, educate, and serve individuals, families and the community by promoting positive values and developing constructive alternatives for the whole person.

Family Life Center’s mission is to empower, educate, and serve individuals, families and the community by promoting positive values and developing constructive alternatives for the whole person.

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Family Life Center VisionLess
Family Life Center Vision

The vision of the Family Life Center is to become a leading community institution heavily engaged in social development, community revitalization and offering individuals it serves with access to economic opportunity.

The vision of the Family Life Center is to become a leading community institution heavily engaged in social development, community revitalization and offering individuals it serves with access to economic opportunity.

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Family Life ValuesLess
Family Life Values

 Personal responsibility, compassion and integrity are the values embraced by the Center. 

 Personal responsibility, compassion and integrity are the values embraced by the Center. 

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About the Founder of the Family Life Center Less
About the Founder of the Family Life Center 

Bishop Melvin E. Clark, Sr., the founding visionary of the Family Life Center, was appointed to the Pastorate of the First Church of God in Christ, Inc. and subsequently its successor, the legendary Church in the Round in 1960, making him the longest serving pastor in the City of Aliquippa. He also oversees a church legacy that spans 97-years, making the enterprise one of the oldest institutions in the Beaver County region. Bishop Clark ‘s achievements as a pastor, and community leader resulted in his consecration to the Bishopric and Jurisdictional Prelate of the Second Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction of the national Churches of God in Christ (These areas span geographical locations of Pittsburgh, Aliquippa, Farrell, and Ohio. His leadership abilities and deep concern for people has brought him before many national and international leaders including four U.S. Presidents. On several occasions he served as an advisor to President Bill Clinton and was sought by the Bush administration to serve in a leadership capacity for many initiatives.  

Bishop Melvin E. Clark, Sr., the founding visionary of the Family Life Center, was appointed to the Pastorate of the First Church of God in Christ, Inc. and subsequently its successor, the legendary Church in the Round in 1960, making him the longest serving pastor in the City of Aliquippa. He also oversees a church legacy that spans 97-years, making the enterprise one of the oldest institutions in the Beaver County region. Bishop Clark ‘s achievements as a pastor, and community leader resulted in his consecration to the Bishopric and Jurisdictional Prelate of the Second Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction of the national Churches of God in Christ (These areas span geographical locations of Pittsburgh, Aliquippa, Farrell, and Ohio. His leadership abilities and deep concern for people has brought him before many national and international leaders including four U.S. Presidents. On several occasions he served as an advisor to President Bill Clinton and was sought by the Bush administration to serve in a leadership capacity for many initiatives.  

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Statement of Need Less
Statement of Need 

The City of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania located in the Beaver County Region was a former steel town that was on the vanguard of the industrial revolution that sprung out of the City of Pittsburgh. Aliquippa and the surrounding areas of Beaver County including Ambridge, Beaver Falls and Midland, Coraopolis offered its employees living in those areas with high paying jobs, shopping stores and recreation. It provided these communities with all the trappings of middle-class success. Located along the Ohio River, just 25 miles northwest of the City of Pittsburgh, Aliquippa was founded by the merger of three towns: Aliquippa, Woodlawn, and New Sheffield.

In 1878, Aliquippa was formed as a borough and named for the Seneca Indian Queen Aliquippa. It was one of several stations along the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad route. Aliquippa was best known in the first part of the 20th century as the location of a productive steel mill constructed by the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company along the Ohio River beginning in 1905. Employment at the facility sustained a population high of over 27,000 by 1940. The mill eventually closed due to the collapse of the steel industry during the mid-1980s. This major economic loss added to the overall trend of transition to the suburbs which resulted in a major population loss through the end of the 20th century. This loss of economic activity has left the City chronically depressed with a population estimated to be about 8,900 in 2018.


Today, Aliquippa like many other struggling communities surrounding the Pittsburgh area has a large concentration of African Americans (38.9%) with 21.6% of all households headed by African American single females, and 24.4% of the children in the community are under 18 years of age. The average Per capita income in 2017 dollars during 2013-2017 was $20,247 with 33.2 % meeting national poverty guidelines.

Due to a dramatic decrease in its tax base and a demonstrated inability to provide basic public services, on October 21, 1987, the City of Aliquippa was effectively put under financial and management oversight and designated under Act 47 as a distressed city by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED).


The municipality continues to struggle and has yet to emerge from the Act 47 designation. The City of Pittsburgh is also under Act 47 supervision. As a historically under-performing school system in crisis, in 2002, the Aliquippa School District was placed on the State of Pennsylvania’s Empowerment School List due to chronic low student achievement in the key academic disciplines of reading and mathematics while serving 1,171 students annually with 115 teachers.  


In April 2014, the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) released a report again identifying all Aliquippa School District schools as among the 15% lowest achieving schools for reading and mathematics in the state. The same year the Pittsburgh Business Times ranked the Aliquippa School District 100th out of 105 Western Pennsylvania School Districts. The ranking was based on the last three years of student academic performance on the PSSAs for: math, reading, writing and science.


The annual Pennsylvania System School Assessment is a standards-based, criterion-referenced assessment which provides students, parents, educators and citizens with an understanding of student and school performance related to the attainment of proficiency of the academic standards. These standards in English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science and Technology identify what a student should know and be able to do at varying grade levels. In 2007, Johns Hopkins University reported that Aliquippa Senior High School was among 47 Pennsylvania schools and 1,700 nationwide high schools with high dropout rates.  


According to 2017 FBI crime data, the crime rate in Aliquippa is considerably higher than the national average across all communities in America. The chances of becoming a victim of either property crime or violent crime is 1 in 41. Aliquippa, according to the report, is not one of the safest communities in America. In relationship to the state of Pennsylvania, Aliquippa’s crime rate is higher than 85% of the states cities and towns of all sizes.


The Department of Health has designated Aliquippa in 2001 and again in 2017 as a health professional shortage area (HPSA). These areas are defined as having a critical shortage of health professionals such as primary care physicians, dentists and mental health providers. Areas where there are shortages of health care providers leads to a need for access to primary care, undiagnosed illnesses, health disparities increased emergency room visits and a need for chronic care management.


All the indicators and data identified above demonstrates communities in crisis. These types of communities in crisis exist across America, are incredibly complex and have riveting effects on the individuals that reside within the boundaries of these locations. To characterize the implications, first there is the effect on the individual and the family, leading to homelessness, domestic violence, child neglect, risks of exposure to disease and incarceration. Then there is the effect on the community, with a loss of community pride, connectedness, safety, as well as declining property values.


The Family Life Center’s approach is to empower individuals and families in struggling communities with resiliency programs and services that address community health outreach, mentoring, training, after school tutoring and more, all of which meet individuals where they are, in their community. FLC functions as a catalyst and positive agent for change heavily focused on social empowerment, community transformation and economic opportunity through its programs and services for residents of Beaver County and its surrounding areas. The FLC takes a proactive role in establishing relationships needed to address community needs. Through its leadership, a broad range of collaborative efforts have been established with the local school district, the health system and community-based organizations. Since the inception of the organization, FLC programs have aided well over 2,500 low-income community residents.


The following section outlines the services provided and offers the potential to replicate existing and expanded services.

The City of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania located in the Beaver County Region was a former steel town that was on the vanguard of the industrial revolution that sprung out of the City of Pittsburgh. Aliquippa and the surrounding areas of Beaver County including Ambridge, Beaver Falls and Midland, Coraopolis offered its employees living in those areas with high paying jobs, shopping stores and recreation. It provided these communities with all the trappings of middle-class success. Located along the Ohio River, just 25 miles northwest of the City of Pittsburgh, Aliquippa was founded by the merger of three towns: Aliquippa, Woodlawn, and New Sheffield.

In 1878, Aliquippa was formed as a borough and named for the Seneca Indian Queen Aliquippa. It was one of several stations along the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad route. Aliquippa was best known in the first part of the 20th century as the location of a productive steel mill constructed by the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company along the Ohio River beginning in 1905. Employment at the facility sustained a population high of over 27,000 by 1940. The mill eventually closed due to the collapse of the steel industry during the mid-1980s. This major economic loss added to the overall trend of transition to the suburbs which resulted in a major population loss through the end of the 20th century. This loss of economic activity has left the City chronically depressed with a population estimated to be about 8,900 in 2018.


Today, Aliquippa like many other struggling communities surrounding the Pittsburgh area has a large concentration of African Americans (38.9%) with 21.6% of all households headed by African American single females, and 24.4% of the children in the community are under 18 years of age. The average Per capita income in 2017 dollars during 2013-2017 was $20,247 with 33.2 % meeting national poverty guidelines.

Due to a dramatic decrease in its tax base and a demonstrated inability to provide basic public services, on October 21, 1987, the City of Aliquippa was effectively put under financial and management oversight and designated under Act 47 as a distressed city by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED).


The municipality continues to struggle and has yet to emerge from the Act 47 designation. The City of Pittsburgh is also under Act 47 supervision. As a historically under-performing school system in crisis, in 2002, the Aliquippa School District was placed on the State of Pennsylvania’s Empowerment School List due to chronic low student achievement in the key academic disciplines of reading and mathematics while serving 1,171 students annually with 115 teachers.  


In April 2014, the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) released a report again identifying all Aliquippa School District schools as among the 15% lowest achieving schools for reading and mathematics in the state. The same year the Pittsburgh Business Times ranked the Aliquippa School District 100th out of 105 Western Pennsylvania School Districts. The ranking was based on the last three years of student academic performance on the PSSAs for: math, reading, writing and science.


The annual Pennsylvania System School Assessment is a standards-based, criterion-referenced assessment which provides students, parents, educators and citizens with an understanding of student and school performance related to the attainment of proficiency of the academic standards. These standards in English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science and Technology identify what a student should know and be able to do at varying grade levels. In 2007, Johns Hopkins University reported that Aliquippa Senior High School was among 47 Pennsylvania schools and 1,700 nationwide high schools with high dropout rates.  


According to 2017 FBI crime data, the crime rate in Aliquippa is considerably higher than the national average across all communities in America. The chances of becoming a victim of either property crime or violent crime is 1 in 41. Aliquippa, according to the report, is not one of the safest communities in America. In relationship to the state of Pennsylvania, Aliquippa’s crime rate is higher than 85% of the states cities and towns of all sizes.


The Department of Health has designated Aliquippa in 2001 and again in 2017 as a health professional shortage area (HPSA). These areas are defined as having a critical shortage of health professionals such as primary care physicians, dentists and mental health providers. Areas where there are shortages of health care providers leads to a need for access to primary care, undiagnosed illnesses, health disparities increased emergency room visits and a need for chronic care management.


All the indicators and data identified above demonstrates communities in crisis. These types of communities in crisis exist across America, are incredibly complex and have riveting effects on the individuals that reside within the boundaries of these locations. To characterize the implications, first there is the effect on the individual and the family, leading to homelessness, domestic violence, child neglect, risks of exposure to disease and incarceration. Then there is the effect on the community, with a loss of community pride, connectedness, safety, as well as declining property values.


The Family Life Center’s approach is to empower individuals and families in struggling communities with resiliency programs and services that address community health outreach, mentoring, training, after school tutoring and more, all of which meet individuals where they are, in their community. FLC functions as a catalyst and positive agent for change heavily focused on social empowerment, community transformation and economic opportunity through its programs and services for residents of Beaver County and its surrounding areas. The FLC takes a proactive role in establishing relationships needed to address community needs. Through its leadership, a broad range of collaborative efforts have been established with the local school district, the health system and community-based organizations. Since the inception of the organization, FLC programs have aided well over 2,500 low-income community residents.


The following section outlines the services provided and offers the potential to replicate existing and expanded services.

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